Tag Archives: Rollins College

Adam Braun: Ordinary Person, Extraordinary Change: How to Affect the Masses

Life-changing circumstances caused Adam Braun to shift dramatically his Wall Street trajectory toward a humanitarian “profit for purpose” approach. Braun will share the story leading to his creation of Pencils of Promise whose mission is educating underprivileged children throughout the world.

Speaker Bio

Adam Braun is a New York Times bestselling author and the Founder of Pencils of Promise, an award-winning organization that has broken ground on more than 300 schools around the world. He also leads the Global Education Platform, an initiative conceived by the UN Special Envoy for Global Education to produce breakthroughs in learning innovation.

As a leader helping individuals, organizations, and companies drive transformation by identifying their true mission, he has been featured as a speaker at The White House, the United Nations and the Clinton Global Initiative. He has also been named to Business Insider’s 40 Under 40, Wired magazine‘s 50 People Who Are Changing the World, and was selected as one of the World Economic Forum’s first 10 “Global Shapers.”

Braun began working summers at hedge funds when he was just sixteen years old, sprinting down the path to a successful Wall Street career. But while traveling abroad he met a young boy begging on the streets of India. When Braun asked him what he wanted most in the world, he simply answered, “a pencil.”

This small request became the inspiration for Pencils of Promise, the organization Braun would leave Bain & Company several years later to launch. Using his unique “for-purpose” approach, he meshed for-profit business acumen with non-profit idealism and created a model now followed by a mission-driven generation.

Braun graduated from Brown University and is a highly sought after speaker at major conferences and Fortune 500 companies. He avidly engages with his social media following of over 500,000 people and in 2015 he received the nation’s most prestigious award for public service, the Jefferson Award.

His book The Promise of a Pencil: How an Ordinary Person Can Create Extraordinary Change debuted at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list and went on to become a No. 1 national bestseller. In the words of Sir Richard Branson, “For anyone with a big dream to change the world, this book will show you how to get it done.”

Bill Bryson: Notes from All Over

Bill Bryson brings to our stage a diverse and widely acclaimed body of work. From his ever-popular A Walk in the Woods—now a feature film starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte—to A Short History of Nearly Everything, he is sure to engage the audience with his witty musing on travel, science, language and history.

Speaker Bio

Current as of August 31, 2015

Bill Bryson is a best-selling author whose books have sold more than 15 million copies and been translated into more than 30 languages. His science book A Short History of Nearly Everything won the 2004 Aventis Prize of the Royal Society and the Descartes Prize, the European Union’s highest literary award. His other books include A Walk in the WoodsThe Life and Times of the Thunderbolt KidAt Home: A Short History of Private Life, and the biography William Shakespeare: The World as Stage. His latest book (published February 2016), The Road to Little Dribbling, examines his longstanding affection for Great Britain. In the fall of 2015, A Walk in the Woods will be released as a movie starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte.

Bryson was Chancellor of the University of Durham, England’s third oldest university, from 2005-11, and for four years was on the board of directors of English Heritage, the British government body responsible for England’s historic environment. From 2006 to 2012, he was president of the Campaign to Protect Rural England, one of Britain’s oldest conservation organizations.

In 2006, he was awarded an honorary OBE (Order of the British Empire) by the British government, and the President’s Prize by Britain’s Royal Society of Chemistry. In 2007, the Museum of Science in Boston, Massachusetts, gave him its annual Bradford Washburn Award, its highest award, for contributions to the popularization of science, and in 2009 he was made an honorary fellow of the Kavli Institute of Particle Physics at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is an honorary fellow of the British Science Association and of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and was editor of the Royal Society’s 350th anniversary book, Seeing Further. Since 2008, the Royal Society of Chemistry has had an annual Bill Bryson Prize for the best school science project. In 2012, he received the Kenneth B. Myer Award from the Florey Institute of Neuroscience in Melbourne, Australia.

He has honorary degrees from Drake University and Oberlin College in America and from eleven British universities.

Bill Bryson is the author of a charitable book, African Diary, which has raised over $500,000 for CARE International, the overseas aid organization. He is a longtime supporter of Conservation International, which works to save endangered species and habitats throughout the world, and has given keynote speeches at its conferences in New York and Los Angeles.

In Britain he is a patron of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust and the Friends of Durham Cathedral. He is also closely associated with the Prince’s Regeneration Trust, the Woodland Trust, St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church, the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, SAVE Britain’s Heritage, and the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London. He is currently patron of the Love Hearts Appeal at Great Ormond Street, which aims to raise funds for new facilities for transplant patients, and to increase awareness of the need for organ donations.

Bill Bryson was born in 1951 in Des Moines, Iowa, and was raised and educated there (BA, Drake University, 1977), but has spent most of his adult life in England. Before becoming a fulltime freelance writer in 1987, he worked as a journalist, principally on The Times.

In addition to his books, he has written extensively for newspapers and magazines throughout the English-speaking world, including National GeographicThe New YorkerThe New York Times,Washington Post, and Sydney Morning Herald.

He lives in Hampshire, England, with his English wife, Cynthia. He has four grown children and nine grandchildren. His principal interests outside work and family are walking in the English countryside and gardening.

Chase Twichell: Reading, On-stage Interview, and Signing

Chase Twichell, Irving Bacheller Professor of Creative Writing and author of seven books of peotry, will give a reading, an on-stage interview, and a signing at Rollins College as a part of the 2016 season of Winter With the Writers.

Event Details

February 17, 2016

Event TBD

  • February 18, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

    Chase Twichell: Master Class
  • February 18, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

    Chase Twichell: Reading, On-Stage Interview, and Signing

Speaker Bio

Current as of October 6, 2015

Chase Twichell was born in 1950, and grew up in Connecticut and the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York. She is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New and Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010).

She has received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts (twice), the Artists Foundation, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. Her work received a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; The Snow Watcher won the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award from the Poetry Society of America. She was awarded a Smart Family Foundation Award in 2004 for poems published in the Yale Review. In 2010, she received an honorary doctorate from St. Lawrence University.

Her 2010 volume of poems won both the Kingsley Tufts Award from Claremont Graduate University and the Balcones Poetry Prize. Other titles include Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New & Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010); Dog Language (Copper Canyon Press, 2005); Perdido (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1991); and The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach, which she co-authored with Robin Behn. She also co-translated Rabindranath Tagore’s The Lover of God (Copper Canyon Press, 2003) with Tony K. Stewart.

She has taught at Princeton University; University of Alabama; Goddard College; Warren Wilson College; Smith College; the Atlantic Center for the Arts; New York University; Vermont College of Fine Arts; The Vermont Studio Center; Bucknell Seminar for Younger Poets; Hampshire College; Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference; The Sewanee Writers’ Conference; New York State Writers’ Conference at Skidmore College; University of Arizona Writers’ Conference; and Napa Valley Writers’ Conference. She was Poet-in-Residence at Bucknell University.

Currently she serves as Chair of the Kate and Kingsley Tufts Awards Jury at Claremont Graduate University. A student in the Mountains and Rivers Order at Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York, she and her husband, the novelist Russell Banks, split the year between the Adirondacks and Miami Beach.

She will serve as the Irving Bacheller Chair in Creative Writing.

Chase Twichell: Master Class

Chase Twichell, Irving Bacheller Professor of Creative Writing and author of seven books of peotry, will host a master class at Rollins College. She will advise Rollins College students on perfecting their craft in front of a live audience as a part of the 2016 season of Winter With the Writers.

Event Details

February 17, 2016

  • February 18, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

    Chase Twichell: Master Class
  • February 18, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

    Chase Twichell: Reading, On-Stage Interview, and Signing

Speaker Bio

Current as of October 6, 2015

Chase Twichell was born in 1950, and grew up in Connecticut and the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York. She is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New and Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010).

She has received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts (twice), the Artists Foundation, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. Her work received a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; The Snow Watcher won the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award from the Poetry Society of America. She was awarded a Smart Family Foundation Award in 2004 for poems published in the Yale Review. In 2010, she received an honorary doctorate from St. Lawrence University.

Her 2010 volume of poems won both the Kingsley Tufts Award from Claremont Graduate University and the Balcones Poetry Prize. Other titles include Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New & Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010); Dog Language (Copper Canyon Press, 2005); Perdido (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1991); and The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach, which she co-authored with Robin Behn. She also co-translated Rabindranath Tagore’s The Lover of God (Copper Canyon Press, 2003) with Tony K. Stewart.

She has taught at Princeton University; University of Alabama; Goddard College; Warren Wilson College; Smith College; the Atlantic Center for the Arts; New York University; Vermont College of Fine Arts; The Vermont Studio Center; Bucknell Seminar for Younger Poets; Hampshire College; Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference; The Sewanee Writers’ Conference; New York State Writers’ Conference at Skidmore College; University of Arizona Writers’ Conference; and Napa Valley Writers’ Conference. She was Poet-in-Residence at Bucknell University.

Currently she serves as Chair of the Kate and Kingsley Tufts Awards Jury at Claremont Graduate University. A student in the Mountains and Rivers Order at Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York, she and her husband, the novelist Russell Banks, split the year between the Adirondacks and Miami Beach.

She will serve as the Irving Bacheller Chair in Creative Writing.

Philip F. Deaver: Reading, On-stage Interview, and Signing

Philip F. Deaver, professor of English at Rollins and author of the soon-to-be-released Forty Martyrs, will give a reading, an on-stage interview, and a signing as a part of the 2016 season of Winter With the Writers.

Event Details

February 10, 2016

Event TBD

  • February 11, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

    Philip F. Deaver: Master Class
  • February 11, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

    Philip F. Deaver: Reading, On-Stage Interview, and Signing

Speaker Bio

Current as of October 6, 2015

Philip F. Deaver is an American author and poet. He was born in Chicago and grew up in Tuscola, Illinois, the oldest of two children. He has lived in Florida since 1984, and since 1998 has been writer in residence and a professor of English at Rollins College.

Many of his stories, published widely in literary magazines, are set in Douglas County, Illinois.

In 1986, Philip became the 13th winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, resulting in the publication of his collection Silent Retreats, re-released in paperback by the University of Georgia Press in the spring of 2008. He is the author of a collection of poetry, How Men Pray (Anhinga Press, 2005). He co-edited an anthology of writing from central Florida entitled Orlando Group and Friends(Arbiter, 1998) and was the editor of an anthology of creative nonfiction essays on baseball, Scoring From Second: Writers on Baseball.

Deaver writes a blog, Long Pine Limited, on the art and craft of literary fiction.

In the fall of 2015, Barrow Press will publish Forty Martyrs, which follows the intertwining lives of a psychologist, his wife, his lover, his lover’s husband, and his lover’s own paramour in the small town of Tuscola, Illinois. Deaver’s natural storytelling voice draws readers in with its familiar rhythms. Through narrative shifts in tone, perspective, and time surrounding the book’s major events—a fire and a stabbing—Deaver creates a beautiful symphonic effect, an ode to small towns and Midwestern lives.

Philip F. Deaver: Master Class

Philip F. Deaver, professor of English at Rollins and author of the soon-to-be-released Forty Martyrs, will host a master class at Rollins. He will advise Rollins students on perfecting their crafts as a part of the 2016 season of Winter With the Writers.

Event Details

February 10, 2016

  • February 11, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

    Philip F. Deaver: Master Class
  • February 11, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

    Philip F. Deaver: Reading, On-Stage Interview, and Signing

Speaker Bio

Current as of October 6, 2015

Philip F. Deaver is an American author and poet. He was born in Chicago and grew up in Tuscola, Illinois, the oldest of two children. He has lived in Florida since 1984, and since 1998 has been writer in residence and a professor of English at Rollins College.

Many of his stories, published widely in literary magazines, are set in Douglas County, Illinois.

In 1986, Philip became the 13th winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, resulting in the publication of his collection Silent Retreats, re-released in paperback by the University of Georgia Press in the spring of 2008. He is the author of a collection of poetry, How Men Pray (Anhinga Press, 2005). He co-edited an anthology of writing from central Florida entitled Orlando Group and Friends(Arbiter, 1998) and was the editor of an anthology of creative nonfiction essays on baseball, Scoring From Second: Writers on Baseball.

Deaver writes a blog, Long Pine Limited, on the art and craft of literary fiction.

In the fall of 2015, Barrow Press will publish Forty Martyrs, which follows the intertwining lives of a psychologist, his wife, his lover, his lover’s husband, and his lover’s own paramour in the small town of Tuscola, Illinois. Deaver’s natural storytelling voice draws readers in with its familiar rhythms. Through narrative shifts in tone, perspective, and time surrounding the book’s major events—a fire and a stabbing—Deaver creates a beautiful symphonic effect, an ode to small towns and Midwestern lives.

Antonio Skarmeta: Reading, On-stage Interview, and Signing

Antonio Skarmeta, Chilean novelist, screenwriter, and diplomat, will give a reading, an on-stage interview, and a signing at Rollins College as a part of the 2016 season of Winter With the Writers.

Event Details

February 3, 2016

Film Screening With Author Introduction
Enzian Theater

  • February 4, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

    Antonio Skármeta: Master Class
  • February 4, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

    Antonio Skármeta: Reading, On-stage Interview, and Signing

Speaker Bio

Current as of October 6, 2015

A Chilean novelist, screenwriter, and diplomat, Antonio Skármeta was the grandson of Yugoslav immigrants. While attending the University of Santiago, from which he graduated in 1963, he produced plays by Edward Albee, William Saroyan, and Eugene Ionesco with the university’s drama group. He received an MA from Columbia Univeristy in 1966 and published his first book, a collection of short stories titled El entusiasmo (Enthusiasm), in 1967. It was followed in 1969 by Desnudo en el tejado (Naked on the Roof)—which won the Casa de las Américas de la Habana Prize and was the first of his works to be widely distributed—and in 1973 by El ciclista del San Cristóbal (The Rider of San Cristóbal). He finished another collection, Tiro libre (Free Kick), as well as the novel Soñé que la nieve ardía (I Dreamt the Snow Was Burning) while living in Argentina in exile from Chile’s military regime.

In 1975 Skármeta moved to Berlin, where he lived until he returned to Santiago in 1988. During this period he wrote Novios y solitarios(Couples and Singles), No pasó nada (Nothing Happened), and La insurrección (The Insurrection). He followed these with Ardiente paciencia, a novel that tells the story of an extraordinary friendship that develops between the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda living in exile, and his postman. Ardiente paciencia subsequently became Skármeta’s most popular work. It was translated into 20 languages and was adapted for the screen twice—in Ardiente paciencia, for which Skármeta wrote the screenplay and which he directed in 1983 (two years before the manuscript was published in book form), and in the Italian film Il postino (The Postman).

Skármeta’s subsequent books include Match BallLa boda del poeta(The Poet’s Wedding), and El baile de la victoria (The Dancer and the Thief). He also published Watch Where the Wolf Is Going (1991), a selection of his short stories in English translation; wrote several other film scripts (including the 1998 adaptation of Isabel Allende’s 1987 novel Eva Luna); hosted a successful television program on books; and translated a number of English-language works into Spanish. He served as Chile’s ambassador to Germany from 2000 to 2003.

In 2011, his novel Los dias del arcoiris (The Days of the Rainbow) won the prestigious Premio iberoamericano Planeta-Casa de América de Narrativa. His play El plebiscito, based on the same true incident as this novel, was the basis for the Oscar-nominated film No.

A film for his 2014 novel, A Distant Father, is scheduled for release in February 2016.

In 2014, he was awarded Chile’s National Literature Prize.

Antonio Skarmeta: Master Class

Antonio Skarmeta, Chilean novelist, screenwriter, and diplomat, will host a master class at Rollins College. He will advise Rollins College students on perfecting their craft in front of a live audience as a part of the 2016 season of Winter With the Writers.

Event Details

February 3, 2016

Film Screening With Author Introduction
Enzian Theater

  • February 4, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

    Antonio Skármeta: Master Class
  • February 4, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

    Antonio Skármeta: Reading, On-stage Interview, and Signing

Speaker Bio

Current as of October 6, 2015

A Chilean novelist, screenwriter, and diplomat, Antonio Skármeta was the grandson of Yugoslav immigrants. While attending the University of Santiago, from which he graduated in 1963, he produced plays by Edward Albee, William Saroyan, and Eugene Ionesco with the university’s drama group. He received an MA from Columbia Univeristy in 1966 and published his first book, a collection of short stories titled El entusiasmo (Enthusiasm), in 1967. It was followed in 1969 by Desnudo en el tejado (Naked on the Roof)—which won the Casa de las Américas de la Habana Prize and was the first of his works to be widely distributed—and in 1973 by El ciclista del San Cristóbal (The Rider of San Cristóbal). He finished another collection, Tiro libre (Free Kick), as well as the novel Soñé que la nieve ardía (I Dreamt the Snow Was Burning) while living in Argentina in exile from Chile’s military regime.

In 1975 Skármeta moved to Berlin, where he lived until he returned to Santiago in 1988. During this period he wrote Novios y solitarios(Couples and Singles), No pasó nada (Nothing Happened), and La insurrección (The Insurrection). He followed these with Ardiente paciencia, a novel that tells the story of an extraordinary friendship that develops between the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda living in exile, and his postman. Ardiente paciencia subsequently became Skármeta’s most popular work. It was translated into 20 languages and was adapted for the screen twice—in Ardiente paciencia, for which Skármeta wrote the screenplay and which he directed in 1983 (two years before the manuscript was published in book form), and in the Italian film Il postino (The Postman).

Skármeta’s subsequent books include Match BallLa boda del poeta(The Poet’s Wedding), and El baile de la victoria (The Dancer and the Thief). He also published Watch Where the Wolf Is Going (1991), a selection of his short stories in English translation; wrote several other film scripts (including the 1998 adaptation of Isabel Allende’s 1987 novel Eva Luna); hosted a successful television program on books; and translated a number of English-language works into Spanish. He served as Chile’s ambassador to Germany from 2000 to 2003.

In 2011, his novel Los dias del arcoiris (The Days of the Rainbow) won the prestigious Premio iberoamericano Planeta-Casa de América de Narrativa. His play El plebiscito, based on the same true incident as this novel, was the basis for the Oscar-nominated film No.

A film for his 2014 novel, A Distant Father, is scheduled for release in February 2016.

In 2014, he was awarded Chile’s National Literature Prize.

Rollins College Hosts Forum on Creating Age-Friendly Communities

An educational forum on creating age-friendly communities. The forum will be led by Kathy Black, professor of Social Work and Gerontology at USF Sarasota-Manatee who will describe an age-friendly community, highlight its eight essential domains, and discuss how residents can become involved in making their community age friendly.

Join community leaders and residents from Central Florida for an educational forum on creating age-friendly communities. The forum will be led by Dr. Kathy Black, Professor of Social Work and Gerontology at USF Sarasota-Manatee who will describe an age-friendly community, highlight its eight essential domains, and discuss how residents can become involved in making their community age friendly. Dr. Black is currently leading Age-Friendly Sarasota, a county-wide effort to promote active, happy and healthy living for people of all ages through a process of learning and sharing Sarasota County’s current age-friendly features and the future aspirations of residents. Sarasota County is the first community in Florida to be recognized as an age-friendly community by the World Health Organization and AARP, a national affiliate of the global effort.

Dr. Kathy Black obtained her Ph.D. from SUNY at Albany and holds dual Master’s Degrees in Social Work and Gerontology from the University of Southern California and a Master’s Degree in Public Health from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Dr. Black is a Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar and a Fellow in the Gerontological Society of America. She has over 30 years of experience working with older adults and their families in the capacity of geriatric case manager, medical social worker, and geriatric nurse in acute and long term care, hospital, nursing home, and community-based settings.

Dr. Black has created and taught over a dozen gerontology courses at the undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate level at universities in New York, California, Florida and France. In addition, she has authored numerous publications on aging for the nation’s largest provider of continuing education in geriatric health care. Dr. Black has conducted more than 100 presentations in the field of health and aging at local, state, national, and international venues and has been the Principal Investigator on more than a dozen grants.

Dr. Black is on the editorial board of Research on Aging, Journal of Social Service Research, and the Journal of Social Work in Palliative & End-of-Life Care and has authored over 40 peer-reviewed publications. This forum is presented through a generous grant from the Winter Park Health Foundation.

Learn more about the lecture series and the Rollins Center for Health Innovation.

Rollins to Host an Evening With Renowned Feminist Author Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Rollins College will host an evening with renowned feminist author and a founding editor of Ms. Magazine Letty Cottin Pogrebin.

LETTY COTTIN POGREBIN is an author, activist, and national lecturer.

A founding editor and writer for Ms. Magazine, Pogrebin is also the author of eleven books, including her new novel, Single Jewish Male Seeking Soulmate, which was published in May 2015, and the acclaimed 2013 guidebook, How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick. Among her other books are two memoirs – Getting Over Getting Older, and Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America – the novel, Three Daughters, and the feminist classic, How to Make it in a Man’s World,

She is also the editor of the anthology, Stories for Free Children, and was the consulting editor on Free to Be, You and Me, Marlo Thomas’ ground-breaking children’s book, record and television special.

Besides her twenty year affiliation with Ms. magazine, Pogrebin has published articles and opeds in The New York TimesWashington Post, , Huffington PostBoston GlobePhiladelphia InquirerL.A. TimesToronto StarThe NationHarpers BazaarTravel & LeisureFamily Circle, and Good Housekeeping, among other publications. She is a regular columnist for Moment magazine, and for ten years, wrote “The Working Woman” column in The Ladies Home Journal.

A leader in many social justice causes, Pogrebin has served two terms as President of The Authors Guild, a national organization dedicated to the protection of writers’ copyright and contract rights; and two terms as Chair of the Board of Americans for Peace Now, an advocacy organization working to promote a tw0-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Letty Cottin Pogrebin’s devotion to advancing inter-group harmony inspired her participation in a longstanding Black-Jewish dialogue group, and two Jewish-Palestinian dialogue groups, one of which is still ongoing. In addition, she is a co-founder of the National Women’s Political Caucus; the Ms. Foundation for Women; the UJA-Federation Task Force on Women, and the International Center for Peace in the Middle East.

She currently serves on the boards of Americans for Peace Now, the Ms. Foundation for Education & Communication, The Free to Be Foundation, the Harvard Divinity School Women Studies in Religion Program, and the Brandeis University Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Pogrebin’s honors include a Yale University Poynter Fellowship in Journalism; an Emmy Award for Free to Be You and Me, inclusion in Who’s Who in America, and dozens of awards and commendations from a variety of NGOs, civic organizations and educational institutions.

Letty Cottin Pogrebin is a graduate of Brandeis University. She lives in New York.

LeVar Burton: The Power of Storytelling: Written, Spoken, Lived

LeVar Burton spans the generations through his acting and activism—from Kunta Kinte in Roots (1977) to Geordi La Forge in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-94, 2002) and Reading Rainbow (1983-2009). Burton will share his life’s narrative and highlight the mentors, including Rollins’s well-loved Fred Rogers, who most influenced how his own story took shape.

Speaker Bio

LeVar Burton launched his acting career while still a student at the University of Southern California. Cast in the groundbreaking role of Kunta Kinte in the landmark television series Roots, at 19 he found himself on the cover of Time Magazine. A seemingly impossible act to follow, Burton managed to do so in dramatic fashion, achieving further global acclaim as Chief Engineer Geordi La Forge in the iconic Star Trek: The Next Generation television series and feature films. But it has been his role as host and executive producer of the beloved PBS children’s series Reading Rainbow that he is most proud of. Airing from 1983 to 2009, it was not only one of the longest-running children’s television shows in history, but also one of the most acclaimed, earning over 200 awards including multiple Emmys and a Peabody.

Always committed to improving children’s education through innovative uses of storytelling, in 2012 Burton launched RRKidz, a digital educational publishing company, co-founded with business partner Mark Wolfe. Together they hold the global rights to the Reading Rainbow brand through a partnership with series creator, WNED/Buffalo. Reading Rainbow was reimagined to combine today’s forms of media and technology with the goal of inspiring a new generation of children to love reading. The all-new Reading Rainbow is a digital reading service filled with over 500 children’s fiction and non- fiction books, newly produced video field trips and new content added every week. With over 16 million books and videos enjoyed since launch, Reading Rainbow is the number one educational app on iTunes and recipient of numerous awards.

Most recently, Burton turned to Kickstarter to bring Reading Rainbow to “Every Child, Everywhere”—especially to classrooms in need. The campaign met its 35-day goal of raising $1 million in less than 11 hours, and became the most popular Kickstarter campaign ever with over 105,000 backers and a final tally of over $6.4 million. As a result, in 2015 RRKidz will introduce Reading Rainbow EDU, complete with engaging supplemental learning content for teachers and students.

And in October, 2014, Reading Rainbow published Burton’s first children’s book, The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm, a powerful and uplifting story to help children cope with the difficulties of everyday life.

The honored recipient of 12 Emmy Awards, a Grammy, and five NAACP Awards, Burton has demonstrated in his career that he can do it all—acting, directing, producing, writing, and speaking. He is often invited as a keynote speaker at leading education and technology events, most recently speaking at NASA, ISTE, The National Headstart Association, and many more.

And in 2014, with educational groups, business organizations and media clamoring to recognize him for the record-setting Reading Rainbow Kickstarter campaign, Burton was named Geek of the Year in the annual Geekie Awards, was listed as one of Ebony Magazine’s Power 100, and earned the World Tech Award for Education, awarded by the World Technology Network.

He now enters his fourth decade in the industry, with millions of fans throughout the world, and continues his mission to inspire, entertain and educate.

John Nolen: The Art of City Planning & Its Restoration

Bruce Stephenson will share insights from his new biography, John Nolen: Landscape Architect & City Planner. It is the final volume in a trilogy Stephenson has written analyzing the origins of city planning, a profession that grew out of the “fine art” of landscape architecture. Stephenson will share the art and relevance of Nolen’s work, especially in regard to sustainability and historic preservation. He will also focus on Nolen’s Florida commissions, his relationship with Hamilton Holt, and his plans to mitigate racism.

Leymah Gbowee: Leading Change Through Activism: The Liberian Women’s Experience

Leymah Gbowee’s life-long passion is to make the world a better place. She has done so by plying her own form of non-violent activism, first in Liberia to end civil war and most recently in North Korea by joining women marching for unity. She will share her mission for peace and her efforts toward that noble goal.

Speaker Bio

Leymah Gbowee is founder and current president of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa. She was the founding head of the Liberian Reconciliation Initiative, and was the co-founder and former executive director of Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WIPSEN-A). She is also a founding member and former Liberia coordinator of Women in Peacebuilding Network/West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (WIPNET/WANEP).

Gbowee is currently named a Distinguished Fellow in Social Justice at Barnard College. She travels internationally to advocate for human rights and peace and security.

Gbowee’s leadership of the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace—which brought together Christian and Muslim women in a nonviolent movement that played a pivotal role in ending Liberia’s civil war in 2003—is chronicled in her memoir, Mighty Be Our Powers, and in the award-winning documentary, Pray the Devil Back to Hell.

Free CFAMily Day at Rollins Cornell Fine Arts Museum Saturday

This Saturday, August 22, 2015 bring your family to Rollins College for a free Family Day at their Cornell Fine Arts Museum. Visit Mcgannbrothers to check some art galleries or info about paintings.

The event from 1 to 5 p.m. celebrates their Education Gallery. This completely renovated space explores how Art can…

  • Connect us
    • Symbolize ideas
      • Tell a story
        • Alter reality

Children can participate in drawing tours, a scavenger hunt and explore a still life station. Parents will love the art activities the kids can make and take with them. To check more details must visit retainedfirefighter .

New also is a doll house that mimics the museum’s galleries. Budding designers will be able to re-envision the space with their own distinctive flair.

The CFAM collection is about conversations… between artists, among students, across generations. Homeschool families, public school students, private school guests are all welcome! Visit this weekend to get the conversation going!

Limited parking is available next to the museum.  You can also park for free in the SunTrust parking garage on Lyman Avenue with museum validation (We’ve recently performed a new door installation vancouver, so there won’t be any trouble).

When a lot of people visit the museum, and there’s a need for new garage door installation york pa, contact the team of shankdoor.com. Questions? Email lbuyo@rollins.edu for more information.

Weekends at Barnie’s

Barnie’s Coffee Kitchen has some exciting things brewing for it’s 35th Anniversary.  The Orlando based coffee house unveiled a re-designed menu which focuses mainly on breakfast and brunch.

Menu highlights include:

IMG_3106 (1)  Shakshuka: a tomato ragout, poached eggs, thyme feta and buttered toast

Avocado Toast: Cilantro, lime, lemon oil, sprouts

Energy Bowl: Acai, almond milk, banana, Greek yogurt, granola

 

 

 

IMG_3107 (1)  Salmon & Bagel: Ducktrap smoked salmon, cream cheese, lemon, dill

Breakfast Panino: fried eggs, bacon, spinach, 2-year cheddar, tomato jam

Anson Mills Oatmeal: stone-cut oats, market berries, flax, maple syrup

 

 

 

IMG_3108  Lamb Meatballs: tomato sauce, goat cheese, salsa verde

Coffee Braised Pulled Pork Sandwich: house-made BBQ sauce, apple-fennel slaw,        bread and butter pickles, medianoche bun

Georgia Peaches salad: smoked salmon, spiced cardamom yogurt, mint, watercress,    pistachio

 

 

Barnie’s is also excited to announce that Blue Bird Bake Shop is their official bakery partner.  An assortment of Blue Bird’s scones, cupcakes, muffins, cookies and cakes will be available at all times.

To celebrate their 35th Anniversary, one classic flavor from the Barnie’s Coffee vault will be brought back and YOU get to decide! Vote for your favorite on the Barnie’s website from the following 4 favorites: Coffee Cake, Decadent Dark Chocolate, Amaretto or Tiramisu.

Not only does this year mark Barnie’s anniversary, but this holiday season marks the 20th anniversary of the ever popular Santa’s White Christmas. Stay tuned, as the season gets closer, celebratory deals, gifts, and events will be announced.

Oh but wait, there’s more! Starting mid-August, Rollins College students, faculty and staff will now receive a 20% discount on all food and beverages (excluding beer and wine).

Of course we can’t forget the coffee! Did you know the pictures that line the walls of the Winter Park location are made using real Barnie’s Coffee? Artist Steven Mikel has created gorgeously detailed monochromatic paintings using nothing but the beverage. He got the idea from seeing a coffee cup stain on a piece of paper!?!

IMG_3104

Barnie’s has extended their weekday hours to 5pm, Friday and Saturday until 8pm and Sunday Brunch (the longest running brunch hours in town) from 7:30am – 6pm.

Orlando – Please Don’t Redefine Us

Lately I’ve been reading numerous articles by extremely passionate Orlando-area citizens, who declare their love for the City Beautiful. They write about the thriving literary community, the bursting tech industry, the outstanding colleges and universities, and even the highly touted food and art scene.

And in nearly every article, each well-meaning writer relates angry disgust that media outlets from across the nation are just now discovering that Orlando isn’t a “cultural wasteland” after all. And as a by-product of that anger, every writer then wants to redefine who we are or wants to describe Orlando as having a rebirth. (As if all our greatness had disappeared until just recently!)

Perhaps this common theme of needing to redefine what Orlando is comes from the fact that most of these writers start their articles by explaining they moved to Central Florida “several years ago” for school or work or to retire. And like many, they didn’t expect to fall in love with the City and were thrilled to see how much it had to offer in the aforementioned literary, arts, food, tech et al. (How ironic they now take exception to the fact that outsiders don’t also know this.) These writers say, “You don’t know the real Orlando. We’re not just Disney.”

While I certainly appreciate these eager citizens wanting to tout how wonderful our area is, I find myself bristling at the term “redefining” because feels like we weren’t good enough before these people arrived in Central Florida and decided to give us a new definition.

You see, I was born and raised here, just like my mother was, and just like my grandmother was back in the 1800s. There are a number of us here, actually, native Central Floridians that have always known what Orlando is and don’t need new arrivals to suddenly tell us what we are and what we have.

We’ve Always Had a Literary Scene

Yes, even before Jack Kerouac.

Back in 1926 Rollins College began the Animated Magazine. Since paper and printing supplies were still in somewhat short supply due to the fairly recent first World War, then-college President Hamilton Holt decided that the articles should be read aloud on stage instead of printed. This turned into an annual event that used to draw thousands. In the crowd sat dignitaries from around the world, including Secretaries of State and even former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover.

Animated Magazine - Rollins College

Animated Magazine – Rollins College

The Animated Magazine lives on today, under the tutelage of editors like U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins, and has helped bring about the annual Winter with the Writers, which is where I got to see Maya Angelou when she visited back in 2007.

With the Orlando Public Library opening in 1923, and the Zora Neale Hurston Festival operating for nearly 30 years now, this is just further evidence the literary scene is not having a rebirth but has quietly been here all along.

We’ve Always Had an Art Scene

One of the nation’s oldest, largest, and most prestigious art festivals happens right here at the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival. The Orlando Museum of Art was established in 1924, the Maitland Art Center in 1937, and we’ve had the Crealde School of Art and Jamali for over 40 years now. Add in the Polasek Museum and the world’s largest collection of Tiffany glass at the Morse Museum, and we’re doing just fine.

Albin Polasek

Albin Polasek

Famed actor Buddy Epsen’s father started the Central Florida Ballet Company in 1945. “I dared not start a ballet company here in Orlando because the idea seemed hopeless,” Epsen was quoted as saying. “Now there are several companies throughout Florida.” Epsen’s company was later taken over by Edith Royal, whose “Ballet Royal” supplied generations of dancers to the great stages of the world.

And even earlier, Ruth Pounds started a dance school in 1935, which taught both my mother and then me how to dance, sit, curtsy, and all the etiquette required of a cultured young adult.

The area has always had beautiful architecture thanks to those like Gamble Rogers, II, who helped create the beauty that attracted leading artists, business tycoons, and top politicians to settle in the area.

When President Dwight Eisenhower dedicated the opening of the basement radio station at Rollins College (still one of the longest-running basement radios in the country), we made indie radio hip long before we made boy bands hip in the 1990s. You can check brief history of radios at Radio Waves.

We’ve Always Had a Tech Scene

Lockheed Martin opened its doors in 1956. (My mother worked there afternoons in high school!) Shortly thereafter, the Kennedy Space Center was built nearby to oversee the Apollo missions. We watched those missions, and later those of the Space Shuttle, right from our backyards – and I’m pretty sure it doesn’t get much cooler than that!

Kennedy Space Center

Kennedy Space Center

Thankfully this tech industry also had a need for engineers; thus UCF was founded in 1963 and has grown into one of the largest universities in the nation. Add in the innovations of Walt Disney in the 70s, and then Full Sail University in the 80s, and yep, we’ve always had a tech scene.

We’ve Always Had a Food Scene

Food trucks did not make the food hip in this city.

We’ve always had great food, ranging from Dixie Crossroads and La Cantina to Le Cordon Bleu and Gary’s Duck Inn. From the 94th Aero Squadron, which served incredible food since World War I, to Ronnie’s Diner which opened in 1956, Orlando always had talked-about food. The fact that the establishments serving that food is changing, doesn’t mean there weren’t great restaurants before the new ones arrived.

Ronnie's Diner

Ronnie’s Diner

With T.G. Lee Dairy and the many orange groves, we’ve always been farm-to-table. And when you add in Publix (founded in 1930), we were doing just fine long before this so-called rebirth.

We’re Growing, Not Rebirthing

Yes, it is an exciting time to be in Orlando. We are growing in many different, wonderful ways. Newcomers are bringing great assets, and companies are setting up roots and investing here. With strong leadership we will continue to flourish.

And while I admire the zeal these newcomers use to tell the rest of the world how great Orlando is, please don’t act like this is a new development in Orlando’s history. Don’t call it a rebirth or try to redefine it.

We are who we are, and always have been.

We don’t want to be New York, San Francisco, or even Austin. We want to be who and what we already are. We’re orange groves and Disney. We’re tech and and old-fashioned books. We’re art and great food.

But, we’re not the best thing since sliced bread… we were cool long before that hit the world back in 1930!

This guest post was written by Bess Auer, fourth generation Floridian and the first editor of the Central Florida Top 5. You can connect with her on Twitter at @Bess_Auer.

Authors Visit Rollins College for 73rd Winter With the Writers

5 Authors From Around the World Visit Rollins! 

Five writers from around the world will take part in the 2013 Winter With the Writers, A Festival of the Literary Arts.  In keeping with Rollins College’s long-standing commitment to bring contemporary literature to the community, the 2013 season will feature a diverse mix of authors, including three-time National Book Award-winner Peter Matthiessen and Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books. For several decades the series has hosted renowned writers who share their work and expertise with students and the community.

 Afternoon master classes and evening readings will take place on the Rollins College campus on four consecutive Thursdays, beginning on February 7. The events are free to the public.  Parking is available in the SunTrust Plaza Parking Garage at no charge.

 Three-time National Book Award-winner Peter Matthiessen will speak on February 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Knowles Memorial Chapel (master class at 4 p.m. at 330 Winter Park Plaza). Matthiessen, a renowned novelist, nature writer, and environmental activist, is the author of many widely-acclaimed works including The Snow Leopard, At Play in the Fields of the Lord, and Shadow Country.

 Pulitzer Prize-nominee Karen Russell will speak on February 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the Knowles Memorial Chapel (master class at 4 p.m. at 330Winter Park Plaza).  Russell is the author of Swamplandia, one of New York Times’ 10 Best Books of 2011. Her new book, Vampires in the Lemon Grove: Stories, is due out on February 12, 2013.

 African-Puerto Rican author Mayra Santos-Febres and Cuban-American poet Ricardo Pau-Llosa will speak on February 21 at 7:30 p.m. at theAnnie Russell Theatre.  Pau-Llosa’s master class will be held at 2 p.m. in the Woolson House; Santos-Febres’ master class will be held at 4 p.m. in the Woolson House. Santos-Febres is a critically acclaimed poet and novelist. Her contributions to the literary world earned her a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship.  Poet Pau-Llosa is widely recognized for his knowledge of Latin American art, as an art critic, lecturer, art collector, curator, essayist, and short story writer.

 Azar Nafisi will speak on February 28 at 7:30 p.m. at the Tiedtke Concert Hall (master class at 4 p.m. in the Galloway Room).  Nafisi is best known forReading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, a book in which she describes her experiences as a secular woman living and working in Iran.

Discussions and readings are free and open to the public. Guests are encouraged to arrive early, as seating is limited. For more information, visit the Winter With the Writers website at www.rollins.edu/winterwiththewriters.

 

You can also like @ https://www.facebook.com/WinterWithTheWriters

 

Founded in 1885, Rollins College is Florida’s oldest recognized college, and is consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of “America’s Best Colleges.” The College of Arts & Sciences and the College of Professional Studies offer full-time undergraduate programs in the liberal arts. Rollins Evening Program, the Hamilton Holt School, serves the Central Florida community by offering exceptional undergraduate and graduate degree programs during evenings and weekends to students diverse in age, experience and professional development. The CrummerGraduate School of Business is ranked a top MBA program by Forbes and Bloomberg Businessweek. For more information about Rollins, visit our website at www.rollins.edu.